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Magical Thinking

Magical Thinking

We were magical as toddlers.

In fact, “magical thinking” is a term used to describe a toddler’s egocentric stage of development; how they learn and make sense of things. Toddlers believe what they do, say or think has an influence on outcomes in their surroundings.

Susan Macknin is a Registered Nurse and Energy Medicine Practitioner. She helps those in physical, emotional or spiritual turmoil by transforming their self-limiting beliefs and stressors. Susan looks forward to helping her clients heal and find inner peace.

Contact: susanmacknin@gmail.com

561-445-4878     

www.BalancedWellness.net

We were magical as toddlers.

In fact, “magical thinking” is a term used to describe a toddler’s egocentric stage of development; how they learn and make sense of things. Toddlers believe what they do, say or think has an influence on outcomes in their surroundings. It also leads to using imagination to enjoy life more… at least until they’re discouraged by society.

As magical thinking children, we believe in the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny and Santa.  We want to be princesses or pirates. But the magic begins to fade as we learn harsh realities like being hurt and tested through life’s lessons. We’re told to stop daydreaming in school and activities groups. And our responsibilities keep us more focused on “reality” and less on imaginative play.

But if we can maintain some of these magical qualities as we get older, we can follow our true paths and goals and passions. We shouldn’t be afraid to dream, and dream big! If we add some of the art of magical thinking, we add play to our busy week, which leads to joy and feeling better, which means fewer aches and pains, more energy and more quality life being lived.  This is the path to manifesting and to living on purpose.

Common phrases in entrepreneurial-ship:

  1. Fake it till you make it – This technique gets a lot of negative press. It’s meant to change the mindset and build confidence by adopting an empowered perspective on your situation. In cognitive behavioral therapy, changing the behavior first will lead to changing how one thinks and feels, which leads to reaching your goals.
  2. Act as if – Based on the idea in psychotherapy that if you behave like the person you want to become, you will become like that in reality. This technique builds motivation and changes the way you think and feel.
  • If you want to feel happier, smile more (as if you are happy).
  • If you want to get more work done, act as if you are a productive person.
  • If you want to have more friends, be a friendly person.
  • If you want to improve your relationship, be a good partner.

As a society, losing our sense of play as we’ve grown seems to have decreased our joy, our imagination, and the inability for many to reach goals. We see its effects around increases in anxiety, depression, and socialization difficulties in our youth.  We are interconnected beings and we all feel the impact of losing our magical thinking, especially as technological advances lead to less and less personal interactions. It’s important for us individually and more so globally to use more imagination and magical thinking in our lives to manifest more joy, more peace, and more positive relationships.

For this reason, I’ve developed a Purposeful Playtime workshop to help recreate magical thinking and to get us back on track to reaching our goals with purpose and passion.  Let’s bring more joy and play into our lives!

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